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Aryeh Goretsky

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  1. Upvote
    Aryeh Goretsky gave kudos to Rami in Chrome 79 always starts a core dump and crashes   
    The current up-to-date version for desktop edition is the v4
    Endpoint edition v7 is running as BETA currently , once it goes stable I believe they will start looking at building the v7 for desktop.
    The fix that Marcos talked about would be probably a small fix (hotfix) that will solve the issue with browsers and that's it , not a major upgrade.
  2. Upvote
    Aryeh Goretsky gave kudos to Marcos in Chrome 79 always starts a core dump and crashes   
    There will be a fix for the issue in both Endpoint and ESET NOD32 for Linux desktop according to the latest news.
  3. Upvote
    Aryeh Goretsky received kudos from Rami in Best wishes for the holidays for 2019 and beyond!   
    Hello,

    As 2019 comes to a close, and just before computers are turned off so that we can spend time with friends and family, I would like to take a moment to wish each and every one of you best wishes for the holiday season, and the forthcoming New Year as well.


    This past year has been equally exciting, challenging and sometimes even terrifying in terms of computer security, and we know that you have many choices when it comes to whom you choose to protect your computers.  We are grateful that you have chosen to place your trust in ESET, and we will do our utmost to ensure that we continue to earn that trust into 2020 and beyond.

    On a personal note, 2019 marks my thirtieth year in the field.  In 1989, I began my career by driving to John McAfee's house and answering the single phone line in-between taking classes at college.  Back then, there were perhaps a couple of dozen computer viruses for PCs running DOS, and about the same for Macs (running the classic Mac OS).  In the intervening three decades, we have seen the rise (and fall) of several computing platforms and entire ecosystems.  We've gone from the dream of having a computer in every home to having one in every room (and sometimes more than one).   Classic computer viruses (i.e., recursively self-replicating code that creates a possibly evolved copy of itself) have become almost extinct as a standalone threat, replaced by an alphabestiary of malicious software, some of which do incorporate viral-like techniques.  The one thing I can say, though, is that I never thought the problem of malicious code would get as bad as it has become today.  The flip side of this, though, is that I am constantly amazed at how good companies like ESET have gotten at combating those threats.  To be a part of ESET and see how the company does things at scale has definitely been a highlight of my career so far, and I hope to continue helping protect your computers for many years to come.

    Wishing you all the best,

    Aryeh Goretsky
  4. Upvote
    Aryeh Goretsky received kudos from Nevi in Gryphon Router   
    Hello,

    Hmm… this is kind of a long answer.  ESET is always looking at all sorts of new (and not-so-new) technologies and how we can better protect people, and the Internet of Things is one of those areas where there are a lot of challenges and a lot of interest.  We have done everything from finding vulnerable devices and reporting them to their vendors (under responsible disclosure guidelines, BTW), as well as looked at the space from the perspective of a higher level overview.  So, from that perspective, ESET does have interest in the space.

    But, that said, it is important to understand that there are a lot of non-obvious background activities that go into shipping actual hardware.  My last employer (before I joined ESET in 2005) was a telephony hardware manufacturer that made embedded systems like VoIP handsets, PoE switches, PBXes and the like.  While that may sound dissimilar to an "IoT device" at first glance, they are really largely the same:  General purpose (commodity) hardware and operating systems software that has been highly-optimized and engineered to perform a few set-purpose activities.  In the case of those devices, that involved things like taking and placing calls, handling voicemail, toggling MWI (message waiting indicator) LEDs and connecting to a variety of standards-based (SIP) and proprietary (Cisco) devices. 

    To get to all of that, though, the company had to go through all sorts of prototyping to design and then test the hardware, source component suppliers, find printed circuit board manufacturers, assembly partners, etc.  Doing all of that requires having lots of electronics engineering talent, with specialization not just in embedded but telecommunications and networking as well.  You have to design the plastics (or contract that out to a design firm), as well as do things like get certification from various regulatory agencies and safety organizations (FCC, UL, TUV and so forth).  You even have to design crush-proof packaging and foam inserts which is a highly-specialized field. 

    Getting device through certification is not always easy (when I left my last employer, they were going through a multi-month long process to get a Bluetooth radio module inside a handset certified for EU use) or cheap.

    And, once you've finally got a working, certifiable product, it gets even more complicated.  If you have a physical product like hardware, you have to have physical space for engineers to sit in, warehouse space for inventory, a shipping department, a QA/testing department, an RMA department for analyzing why units failed in the field and repairing them and so forth.  Also, expect to re-spin (revise) your product's hardware several times over its life-cycle to fix bugs in it.  Those will occur, no matter how much you design or test for them.  At my last employer, they had one product with a circuit board on revision H (8th revision) because revisions A though G had flaws in them.  Even something as simple as the Raspberry Pi 4 has design flaws that need to be fixed with a board redesign.
    All together, that is a lot of work, and while ESET has engaged in some activities-at-scale before which required some specialized engineering, making an IoT security device is in a different kind of direction than the has historically been in.

    That's not to say that you will never see an ESET IoT security device, but just not to expect anything in the near term, because there's a lot of work to do to get into the hardware space.  It may instead be more effective to partner with companies to provide that kind of functionality.  But, that's a discussion far beyond my area of expertise.

    Regards,

    Aryeh Goretsky
     
     
     
  5. Upvote
    Aryeh Goretsky received kudos from TomasP in Best wishes for the holidays for 2019 and beyond!   
    Hello,

    As 2019 comes to a close, and just before computers are turned off so that we can spend time with friends and family, I would like to take a moment to wish each and every one of you best wishes for the holiday season, and the forthcoming New Year as well.


    This past year has been equally exciting, challenging and sometimes even terrifying in terms of computer security, and we know that you have many choices when it comes to whom you choose to protect your computers.  We are grateful that you have chosen to place your trust in ESET, and we will do our utmost to ensure that we continue to earn that trust into 2020 and beyond.

    On a personal note, 2019 marks my thirtieth year in the field.  In 1989, I began my career by driving to John McAfee's house and answering the single phone line in-between taking classes at college.  Back then, there were perhaps a couple of dozen computer viruses for PCs running DOS, and about the same for Macs (running the classic Mac OS).  In the intervening three decades, we have seen the rise (and fall) of several computing platforms and entire ecosystems.  We've gone from the dream of having a computer in every home to having one in every room (and sometimes more than one).   Classic computer viruses (i.e., recursively self-replicating code that creates a possibly evolved copy of itself) have become almost extinct as a standalone threat, replaced by an alphabestiary of malicious software, some of which do incorporate viral-like techniques.  The one thing I can say, though, is that I never thought the problem of malicious code would get as bad as it has become today.  The flip side of this, though, is that I am constantly amazed at how good companies like ESET have gotten at combating those threats.  To be a part of ESET and see how the company does things at scale has definitely been a highlight of my career so far, and I hope to continue helping protect your computers for many years to come.

    Wishing you all the best,

    Aryeh Goretsky
  6. Upvote
    Aryeh Goretsky gave kudos to peteyt in Again & again coming message window   
    When it comes to potentially unwanted programs you can completely disable this option in the detection engine area. PUA programs are programs that aren't technically viruses but they have bad business practices e.g. hard to remove, try to instal extras e.g. toolbars, might contain adware and try and send information back etc. The idea with a PUA is when the option is enabled it is up to the user to decide if the pros of using it outweigh the risks. 
    If you want to keep PUA alerts on and it comes up with the pop up as you first showed by clicking the advanced arrow it will give you an option to exclude. 
    Finally I'd like to warn you that using cracked software always comes with risks because they are coming from non official places and could contain extras.
  7. Upvote
    Aryeh Goretsky gave kudos to itman in Again & again coming message window   
    It is unclear what you want to do.
    Refer to this Eset knowledgebase article for options available when the potentially unwanted application alert appears: https://support.eset.com/en/what-is-a-potentially-unwanted-application-or-potentially-unwanted-content
  8. Upvote
    Aryeh Goretsky received kudos from Custerinky in Best wishes for the holidays for 2019 and beyond!   
    Hello,

    As 2019 comes to a close, and just before computers are turned off so that we can spend time with friends and family, I would like to take a moment to wish each and every one of you best wishes for the holiday season, and the forthcoming New Year as well.


    This past year has been equally exciting, challenging and sometimes even terrifying in terms of computer security, and we know that you have many choices when it comes to whom you choose to protect your computers.  We are grateful that you have chosen to place your trust in ESET, and we will do our utmost to ensure that we continue to earn that trust into 2020 and beyond.

    On a personal note, 2019 marks my thirtieth year in the field.  In 1989, I began my career by driving to John McAfee's house and answering the single phone line in-between taking classes at college.  Back then, there were perhaps a couple of dozen computer viruses for PCs running DOS, and about the same for Macs (running the classic Mac OS).  In the intervening three decades, we have seen the rise (and fall) of several computing platforms and entire ecosystems.  We've gone from the dream of having a computer in every home to having one in every room (and sometimes more than one).   Classic computer viruses (i.e., recursively self-replicating code that creates a possibly evolved copy of itself) have become almost extinct as a standalone threat, replaced by an alphabestiary of malicious software, some of which do incorporate viral-like techniques.  The one thing I can say, though, is that I never thought the problem of malicious code would get as bad as it has become today.  The flip side of this, though, is that I am constantly amazed at how good companies like ESET have gotten at combating those threats.  To be a part of ESET and see how the company does things at scale has definitely been a highlight of my career so far, and I hope to continue helping protect your computers for many years to come.

    Wishing you all the best,

    Aryeh Goretsky
  9. Upvote
    Aryeh Goretsky received kudos from ProTruckDriver in Best wishes for the holidays for 2019 and beyond!   
    Hello,

    As 2019 comes to a close, and just before computers are turned off so that we can spend time with friends and family, I would like to take a moment to wish each and every one of you best wishes for the holiday season, and the forthcoming New Year as well.


    This past year has been equally exciting, challenging and sometimes even terrifying in terms of computer security, and we know that you have many choices when it comes to whom you choose to protect your computers.  We are grateful that you have chosen to place your trust in ESET, and we will do our utmost to ensure that we continue to earn that trust into 2020 and beyond.

    On a personal note, 2019 marks my thirtieth year in the field.  In 1989, I began my career by driving to John McAfee's house and answering the single phone line in-between taking classes at college.  Back then, there were perhaps a couple of dozen computer viruses for PCs running DOS, and about the same for Macs (running the classic Mac OS).  In the intervening three decades, we have seen the rise (and fall) of several computing platforms and entire ecosystems.  We've gone from the dream of having a computer in every home to having one in every room (and sometimes more than one).   Classic computer viruses (i.e., recursively self-replicating code that creates a possibly evolved copy of itself) have become almost extinct as a standalone threat, replaced by an alphabestiary of malicious software, some of which do incorporate viral-like techniques.  The one thing I can say, though, is that I never thought the problem of malicious code would get as bad as it has become today.  The flip side of this, though, is that I am constantly amazed at how good companies like ESET have gotten at combating those threats.  To be a part of ESET and see how the company does things at scale has definitely been a highlight of my career so far, and I hope to continue helping protect your computers for many years to come.

    Wishing you all the best,

    Aryeh Goretsky
  10. Upvote
    Aryeh Goretsky received kudos from peteyt in Best wishes for the holidays for 2019 and beyond!   
    Hello,

    As 2019 comes to a close, and just before computers are turned off so that we can spend time with friends and family, I would like to take a moment to wish each and every one of you best wishes for the holiday season, and the forthcoming New Year as well.


    This past year has been equally exciting, challenging and sometimes even terrifying in terms of computer security, and we know that you have many choices when it comes to whom you choose to protect your computers.  We are grateful that you have chosen to place your trust in ESET, and we will do our utmost to ensure that we continue to earn that trust into 2020 and beyond.

    On a personal note, 2019 marks my thirtieth year in the field.  In 1989, I began my career by driving to John McAfee's house and answering the single phone line in-between taking classes at college.  Back then, there were perhaps a couple of dozen computer viruses for PCs running DOS, and about the same for Macs (running the classic Mac OS).  In the intervening three decades, we have seen the rise (and fall) of several computing platforms and entire ecosystems.  We've gone from the dream of having a computer in every home to having one in every room (and sometimes more than one).   Classic computer viruses (i.e., recursively self-replicating code that creates a possibly evolved copy of itself) have become almost extinct as a standalone threat, replaced by an alphabestiary of malicious software, some of which do incorporate viral-like techniques.  The one thing I can say, though, is that I never thought the problem of malicious code would get as bad as it has become today.  The flip side of this, though, is that I am constantly amazed at how good companies like ESET have gotten at combating those threats.  To be a part of ESET and see how the company does things at scale has definitely been a highlight of my career so far, and I hope to continue helping protect your computers for many years to come.

    Wishing you all the best,

    Aryeh Goretsky
  11. Upvote
    Aryeh Goretsky received kudos from peteyt in Gryphon Router   
    Hello,

    Hmm… this is kind of a long answer.  ESET is always looking at all sorts of new (and not-so-new) technologies and how we can better protect people, and the Internet of Things is one of those areas where there are a lot of challenges and a lot of interest.  We have done everything from finding vulnerable devices and reporting them to their vendors (under responsible disclosure guidelines, BTW), as well as looked at the space from the perspective of a higher level overview.  So, from that perspective, ESET does have interest in the space.

    But, that said, it is important to understand that there are a lot of non-obvious background activities that go into shipping actual hardware.  My last employer (before I joined ESET in 2005) was a telephony hardware manufacturer that made embedded systems like VoIP handsets, PoE switches, PBXes and the like.  While that may sound dissimilar to an "IoT device" at first glance, they are really largely the same:  General purpose (commodity) hardware and operating systems software that has been highly-optimized and engineered to perform a few set-purpose activities.  In the case of those devices, that involved things like taking and placing calls, handling voicemail, toggling MWI (message waiting indicator) LEDs and connecting to a variety of standards-based (SIP) and proprietary (Cisco) devices. 

    To get to all of that, though, the company had to go through all sorts of prototyping to design and then test the hardware, source component suppliers, find printed circuit board manufacturers, assembly partners, etc.  Doing all of that requires having lots of electronics engineering talent, with specialization not just in embedded but telecommunications and networking as well.  You have to design the plastics (or contract that out to a design firm), as well as do things like get certification from various regulatory agencies and safety organizations (FCC, UL, TUV and so forth).  You even have to design crush-proof packaging and foam inserts which is a highly-specialized field. 

    Getting device through certification is not always easy (when I left my last employer, they were going through a multi-month long process to get a Bluetooth radio module inside a handset certified for EU use) or cheap.

    And, once you've finally got a working, certifiable product, it gets even more complicated.  If you have a physical product like hardware, you have to have physical space for engineers to sit in, warehouse space for inventory, a shipping department, a QA/testing department, an RMA department for analyzing why units failed in the field and repairing them and so forth.  Also, expect to re-spin (revise) your product's hardware several times over its life-cycle to fix bugs in it.  Those will occur, no matter how much you design or test for them.  At my last employer, they had one product with a circuit board on revision H (8th revision) because revisions A though G had flaws in them.  Even something as simple as the Raspberry Pi 4 has design flaws that need to be fixed with a board redesign.
    All together, that is a lot of work, and while ESET has engaged in some activities-at-scale before which required some specialized engineering, making an IoT security device is in a different kind of direction than the has historically been in.

    That's not to say that you will never see an ESET IoT security device, but just not to expect anything in the near term, because there's a lot of work to do to get into the hardware space.  It may instead be more effective to partner with companies to provide that kind of functionality.  But, that's a discussion far beyond my area of expertise.

    Regards,

    Aryeh Goretsky
     
     
     
  12. Upvote
    Aryeh Goretsky received kudos from Rami in Friends visit and want my wifi   
    Hello,

    ESET is not in the wireless networking business, but using a guest wireless network without access to  your own internal network of machines is a good start.  Keeping the router up-to-date with the latest firmware from the manufacturer is important, too.  If they are no longer providing updates, you can look to see if firmware from a third-party is available, such as DD-WRT, or replace the router with a new, supported device.  If you are using ESET Internet Security or ESET Smart Security Premium, you can use the Connected Home Monitor feature to see what is attached to your internal network.

    For scanning other people's computers, you may want to consider using a USB flash drive with ESET SysRescue Live installed to it.

    Regards,

    Aryeh Goretsky
  13. Upvote
    Aryeh Goretsky gave kudos to Marcos in Application Control or Whitelisting Features in the Future?   
    As far as I know, we don't plan to have Application control any time soon (meaning in the next few moths). Currently it's only possible to create HIPS rules to block execution of specific executables based on the path.
  14. Upvote
    Aryeh Goretsky gave kudos to Marcos in Real-time protection of ESET IS v13.0.24.0 false alarm   
    It was resolved immediately when you reported it here. Not sure what exactly you mean by "supports" but a correct way how to report false positives is following the instructions at https://support.eset.com/en/submit-a-virus-website-or-potential-false-positive-sample-to-the-eset-lab.
  15. Upvote
    Aryeh Goretsky gave kudos to Marcos in Real-time protection of ESET IS v13.0.24.0 false alarm   
    There are no such agreements. It would mean that every AV maker would have to have an agreement with every company or person in the world that compiles files and creates applications. It is obvious that AV makers fix false positives in their own interest as well.
    Also I wrote that the detection was fixed so your conclusion is incorrect.
  16. Upvote
    Aryeh Goretsky gave kudos to itman in Important question regarding ESET at a startup.   
    In Win 10, Eset uses the Early Launch Anti-malware;  i.e. ELAM, driver to load its kernel process drivers prior to any other non-device drivers. You can read about ELAM here: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-hardware/drivers/install/early-launch-antimalware
  17. Upvote
    Aryeh Goretsky gave kudos to Marcos in Important question regarding ESET at a startup.   
    Ekrn.exe is the crucial process responsible for protection. It starts with Windows as early as possible.
  18. Upvote
    Aryeh Goretsky gave kudos to Marcos in Files encrypted by ransomware   
    There's nothing like perpetual motion in the AV world either, ie. a product that would proactively detect 100% of malware with zero false positives. Every AV program needs to update on a regular basis in order to protect users from new borne malware.
  19. Upvote
    Aryeh Goretsky gave kudos to Marcos in How to re-acquire my Eset lincense key   
    You can get your license email resent using the form https://www.eset.com/int/support/lost-license/
  20. Upvote
    Aryeh Goretsky gave kudos to SysEPr in Future changes to ESET Security Management Center / ESET Remote Administrator   
    Description: Color code failing tasks
    Detail:  The server used to color code the tasks that are failing. I'm running the latest ESMC, and now, that doesn't happen, and I have a hard time figuring out which tasks are failing. Is there a way to color code it again, or where can I see it? All I get is a generic email saying: "At least one client task has invalid configuration and therefore will fail."
  21. Upvote
    Aryeh Goretsky gave kudos to dschwenk in Future changes to ESET Security Management Center / ESET Remote Administrator   
    We'd like to use the device control features in ESET to replace the software we currently use, but unfortunately we aren't able to customize the specific message that displays. We want it to include our corporate policy for external devices and instructions to the user when a device they plug in gets blocked. Ideally we'd like to also include a URL that the user could click on to generate a request for access. 
    In short, it would be nice to be able to customize notification messages depending on the event in addition to globally.
     
    Thank you!
  22. Upvote
    Aryeh Goretsky gave kudos to peteyt in (Question) Will ESET Smart Security 2014 CD version work on Windows 10?   
    The good thing with eset is that licenses work for all versions e.g. if you buy the latest version and a new version comes out you can upgrade as the license is for the product not the version.
    Just follow what Marco's said above and you should be good to go
  23. Upvote
  24. Upvote
    Aryeh Goretsky gave kudos to foneil in ESET Knowledgebase YouTube channel 10-year anniversary   
    The ESET Knowledgebase YouTube Channel celebrates its 10-year anniversary today! 
    https://www.youtube.com/user/ESETKnowledgebase/community
    Check out the infographic for our lifetime YouTube statistics for the channel. 
    The ESET Knowledgebase channel includes step-by-step video tutorials demonstrating the key processes and features of our ESET products, from ESET NOD32 Antivirus and ESET Internet Security to business products like ESET Security Management Center. In addition, our channel is yet another way for our customers to reach us with feedback and questions. 
    We make every effort to respond to support-related comments and yes, we do take video suggestions!

  25. Upvote
    Aryeh Goretsky received kudos from ricoip in Rules of the ESET Security Forum   
    Welcome to the ESET Security Forum!
     
    ESET is pleased to provide you with this resource in order to make it easy for you to ask questions and receive answers about ESET's products and services.  Understand that the ESET Security Forum is a private community for existing customers of ESET, prospective customers who are interested in ESET's software, ESET employees and business partners.  Because of this focus, it is not like a general public forum, where conversations take place on a variety of non-ESET and non-security related topics.
     
    With that in mind, we have the following rules in place:
     
    When registering for an account on the forum, please fill out the information accurately and correctly.
    Do not enter the Username and Password for your licensed ESET software, but instead choose a username (in Latin) unique to this forum.  You should also choose a suitably complex password unique to this forum as well. Do not create multiple accounts.  If a person is found creating multiple accounts, ESET reserves the right to take whatever actions it deems necessary, including banning, blocking, deleting and/or merging them.  The exception to this rule is ESET staff, who may create multiple accounts for testing purposes. No impersonating other forum users, ESET employees or other people. Use appropriate language in the forum.  No vulgar, obscene or rude language will be tolerated. No vulgar, obscene or otherwise offensive images or video will be tolerated. ESET staff have the right to move, edit or modify messages that you post.  This may be done for clarity, to move a message to more appropriate forum where it will receive more attention, or for other reasons outlined in these rules. All decisions by ESET staff are final, and not open to discussion. This list may be updated at any time.  Please periodically visit this page to review any updates. Do not post direct links to any executable files, malicious/suspicious software or web sites in public messages, even if you think the software or site is clean and incorrectly detected by ESET.  Break up the URL by inserting spaces into it, or replacing the protocol handler with an obfuscated one, like . Do not attach malicious or suspicious files to messages, even if you think they are clean.  Write a public message, and then use the "report this message" option to send a private message to ESET staff with a link. Do not post any personally identifiable information (PII) about yourself, such as an email or mailing address or phone number, in a public message. Do not post the username and password or license key for your ESET software in a public message. Do not post links to software cracking tools, license key generators, pirated copies of software or other illicit software in the forum.  If you wish to report a site, write a public message, and then use the "report this message" option to send a private message to ESET staff with a link. Do not post private correspondence (private messages, email, etc.) publicly within the forum. Do not post "A vs. B" or "Which product is best?" type messages in the forum. Do not post overtly commercial messages in the forum (this includes in your signature). Do not pre-announce releases.  Due to differences in scheduling, it may sometimes take several hours after a release has appeared on ESET's web site for the release announcement to appear here in the forum. Do not abuse the forum's rich text controls.  Messages and signatures with inappropriate font selection, including size, color and, for signatures, length, may be edited by forum staff to conform to standards of decency. Do not ask other users for logs, especially if they may contain sensitive or other personally identifiable information. Posts made on behalf of a 3rd party company may only be made from accounts registered with an email address from the company's domain (verifiable by ESET staff). Do not use the "Report post" function for other purposes than reporting inappropriate content requiring moderators' attention. Do not report possibly incorrect detections or blocks (false positives) in the forum unless they may affect a lot of users. If you think that your application or website is detected or blocked incorrectly, please report it to ESET as per the instructions at https://support.eset.com/kb141. Be civil, do not post sarcastic, offensive or mocking comments towards any person or entity. Do not post messages that are off-topic, keep the discussion to the point and do not lead it astray. To discuss a different, unrelated issue or question, always create a new topic. If you have any questions or comments, please contact one of ESET's moderators.
     
    Last Revised: 5 March 2019.
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