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I would like to be contacted by management.  I have turned off auto pay the last two years and eset has turned it back on and charged me for an update.   I would like to report this as theft.   I buy security so I won't be stolen from.  I am very upset and find your company's behavior a scam. 

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Please contact ESET LLC to clear up things, e.g. by filling in this form:
https://www.eset.com/int/support/contact/

Phone services are available; however our customers may experience longer than usual wait times due to COVID-19.
Call: +1 (844) 824-3738 in San Diego, CA USA; press 1 for questions about ESET products or assistance with credit card payments. Available Monday-Friday, 6:00am - 5:00pm Pacific Time [GMT-8]

 

I was able to find only one EIS license registered with your forum email address that is valid until Nov 22, 2020.

 

 

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FYI - here's how to stop these renewal "shenanigans" by Eset and other AV vendors who also do likewise:

1. Most U.S. major bank credit card issuers now offer a "one-time use" card number issue. They basically issue this card number on their web site. It is internally linked to your actual credit card account. Once that card number has been used for a purchase it is not longer valid.

Possible problems with the above is refunds. Most retailers/e-tailers will only issue refunds via initial payment method. You would have to check with your bank about this.

2. Purchase a pre-amount loaded credit or debit card for the dollar amount nearest to the actual renewal purchase price plus applicable state/local sales tax.

The issue with this alternative is I have had at least one problem using one of these for an on-line purchase. However, this was a rebate preloaded card and it had some weird validation requirements.

Also, the above are the most secure methods to perform any Internet purchase. 

Edited by itman
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4 hours ago, itman said:

FYI - here's how to stop these renewal "shenanigans" by Eset and other AV vendors who also do likewise:

1. Most U.S. major bank credit card issuers now offer a "one-time use" card number issue. They basically issue this card number on their web site. It is internally linked to your actual credit card account. Once that card number has been used for a purchase it is not longer valid.

Possible problems with the above is refunds. Most retailers/e-tailers will only issue refunds via initial payment method. You would have to check with your bank about this.

2. Purchase a pre-amount loaded credit or debit card for the dollar amount nearest to the actual renewal purchase price plus applicable state/local sales tax.

The issue with this alternative is I have had at least one problem using one of these for an on-line purchase. However, this was a rebate preloaded card and it had some weird validation requirements.

Also, the above are the most secure methods to perform any Internet purchase. 

Really companies should probably untick this by default then the user has to turn it on by themselves

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Since Eset N.A. is located in California, I assume they are subject to that state's laws. As posted below, it appears Eset N.A. is in violation of California's Automatic Renewal Law (ARL). Specifically, item no. 2, Affirmative consent, and possibly, item no.1, Clear and conspicuous. As such, an inquiry to California's Attorney General office for clarification would be appropriate:

Quote

Key provisions of the ARL

The operating provisions of the ARL are located at Section 17602 of California's Business and Professions Code. Broadly speaking, the ARL imposes five requirements for any business that makes an "automatic renewal or continuous service"2 offer to a California consumer:

1. Clear and conspicuous. The offer must be presented in a "clear and conspicuous manner" and done so before the agreement is consummated and in "visual proximity" to the request for consent.

2. Affirmative consent. The consumer must first provide "affirmative consent" to the offers agreement before charging.

3. Acknowledgement. The business must provide the consumer with a retainable acknowledgement of (a) the offer's terms; (b) the cancellation policy; and (c) information about how to cancel, as described below. (In the event of a "free trial," there must be a disclosure about how to cancel–and an allowance for cancellation–before the consumer pays for the good or service.) It is acceptable for the acknowledgement to be fulfilled after the completion of the initial order.

4. Cancellation. The business must provide a cancellation method which is (a) a toll-free telephone number; (b) an email address; (c) a postal address, if the seller directly bills the consumer; or (d) another "cost-effective, timely, and easy-to-use mechanism."

5. Notice of material change. A "material" change in an offer's terms must be noticed to the consumer–prior to implementation of the change–in a "clear and conspicuous" way if the California consumer had earlier accepted the offer. This notice must also provide retainable information about how to cancel the accepted offer.

 

https://www.dlapiper.com/en/us/insights/publications/2018/07/new-changes-to-californias-automatic-renewal-law/

Edited by itman
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