Jump to content

The process of 64 bit Endpoint Antivirus 5 is 32 bit?


Calgresh
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hello,

I installed a 64-bit Endpoint Antivirus 5 (version 5.0.2265.0). But I saw a process "ekrn.exe" with a tag "32 bits". Does it mean that the kernel of the software is still 32-bit? Also I saw a process "egui.exe" with a tag "64 bits". Only the egui.exe process is 64-bit? I'm a bit confused. Could I have accidentally installed the 32 bit version of Endpoint Antivirus 5?

EEA - 1.PNG

EEA - 2.PNG

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • ESET Moderators

Hello,

You installed the correct version of ESET Endpoint Antivirus 5 for your operating system, Calgresh.

ESET Endpoint Antivirus 5 contains a mixture of both 32-bit and 64-bit code, with parts that need to be 64-bit, such as drivers, compiled as 64-bit code, while other parts may be 32-bit or 64-bit.  This does not affect in any way how the program operates or protects your computer--it's just how that version of the software was engineered.

Regards,

Aryeh Goretsky

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Administrators

A 64-bit ekrn.exe will be introduced in Endpoint v7. The latest version 6 still has a 32-bit version of ekrn.exe but that virtually does not have any drawbacks.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, Marcos said:

A 64-bit ekrn.exe will be introduced in Endpoint v7. The latest version 6 still has a 32-bit version of ekrn.exe but that virtually does not have any drawbacks.

One more reason to wait for v7 :) Thanks for this info!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Administrators
43 minutes ago, bbahes said:

One more reason to wait for v7 :) Thanks for this info!

Why? Whether ekrn is 32 or 64-bit, it doesn't make any difference for users. Vendors have been successfully using 32-bit kernels on x64 systems for years without issues.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

14 minutes ago, Marcos said:

Why? Whether ekrn is 32 or 64-bit, it doesn't make any difference for users. Vendors have been successfully using 32-bit kernels on x64 systems for years without issues.

I just wonder would it make difference in performance? Why are you then moving to 64bit architecture?

For example we have 32bit application that loads 64bit plugin. Performance is horrible... 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That's because you'll be going via thunking, where performance is dire. I guess it makes sense to move to 64-bit - before long you won't get 32-bit computers, everything will be 64-bit. Windows server OS has already done that, and surely the clients won't be far behind. Of the 180 computers I manage, I think we have one that's 32-bit.

 

Jim

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, jimwillsher said:

That's because you'll be going via thunking, where performance is dire. I guess it makes sense to move to 64-bit - before long you won't get 32-bit computers, everything will be 64-bit. Windows server OS has already done that, and surely the clients won't be far behind. Of the 180 computers I manage, I think we have one that's 32-bit.

 

Jim

The story about moving to 64bit only architecture is very old. I'm sure at some point most of software will be 64bit only. However at the moment situation is not that bright from developer side. In our situation we are forced to use 32bit app that loads 64bit plugin on 64bit Windows. This situation forces CPU to convert 32bit instructions to 64bit and that takes additional CPU time. Not to mention 32bit memory address space limit...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...