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Password Manager


jsearl
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In their latest bulletin, ESET recommend the use of a Password Manager.  As a novice in these matters, it seems to me that trusting all of your passwords etc. to a piece of proprietary software, that could conceivable be accessed by third parties, seems to me to be inherently insecure.  Can anybody tell me why these products are not inherently insecure?

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John Earl

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Password managers that require a master password to access the encrypted database that stores the passwords make them safer.

There are many different authors of password managers and IF anyone did try and hack them, they would first have to at least know what password manager you are using in the first place, out of the hundreds in use.

Things like password managers or on screen keyboards lessen the chances of keyloggers stealing your data.

Its not a magic bullet , pretty much like any security product. It just reduces the chances of having your login details stolen.

In reality you have more chance of your details being stolen from a poorly secured website , than a password manager being hacked.

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On 05/09/2017 at 0:16 PM, jsearl said:

In their latest bulletin, ESET recommend the use of a Password Manager.  As a novice in these matters, it seems to me that trusting all of your passwords etc. to a piece of proprietary software, that could conceivable be accessed by third parties, seems to me to be inherently insecure.  Can anybody tell me why these products are not inherently insecure?

Thanks

John Earl

The scary thing is it's not impossible. OneLogin suffered a breach that was reported back in June hxxp://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-40118699

For me I use Sticky Password which is also the password manager Eset's password manager is based on. However I don't save key passwords e.g. banking. I have multiple accounts with sites and some are very strict/specific in regards to passwords. It's hard when you have different passwords to remember them all so the password manager comes in handy.

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On 2017/9/5 at 7:16 PM, jsearl said:

In their latest bulletin, ESET recommend the use of a Password Manager.  As a novice in these matters, it seems to me that trusting all of your passwords etc. to a piece of proprietary software, that could conceivable be accessed by third parties, seems to me to be inherently insecure.  Can anybody tell me why these products are not inherently insecure?

https://www.recoverywindowspassword.com/

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John Earl

Nice ,If only the Password Manager would support all Windows systems, we don't have to worry about  we can not getting into the computer anymore since forgot Windows password ,

 

Edited by Waskker
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I am using LastPass which does have two-factor authentication available. Took a bit of getting used to it, but having 70 or so passwords, a password manager is a useful tool. And no, I am not being subsidized/compensated  by LastPass. How-to-Geek had a write up (12/16) on password managers you might want to take a look at.

https://www.howtogeek.com/141500/why-you-should-use-a-password-manager-and-how-to-get-started/

https://www.lastpass.com/how-it-works

 

Edited by TomFace
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