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Real-time Clean File Cache


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Within the Real-time Protection Advanced Setup, there's a setting for the clean file cache. I have read what is within the help file:

 

 

To minimize system footprint when using Real-time protection, you can define the size of the optimization cache. Enable clean file cache must be enabled for this setting to take effect. If Enable clean file cache is disabled, all files are scanned each time they are accessed. Files will not be scanned repeatedly after being cached (unless they have been modified), until the cache is full. Files are scanned again immediately after each virus signature database update. Click Enable clean file cache to enable/disable this function. To set the amount of files to be cached simply enter the desired value in the input field next to Cache size.

 

Is there any particular decision to have 50,000 files as the default cache size, and if I increased it to the maximum it allows me or a number higher than the total file count on my Mac, wouldn't that be better than the default according to the description above? Wondering if there's an optimal amount or why the clean file cache isn't just automatically caching every file unless they have been modified.

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Probably 50,000 files was selected as the optimum number. The bigger cache, the more memory would need to be allocated and the less effective it would be.

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Probably 50,000 files was selected as the optimum number. The bigger cache, the more memory would need to be allocated and the less effective it would be.

 

Thanks Marcos, I will leave it as is.

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