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How block local IP range Eset Smart Security 9


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Please elaborate more on what you would like to achieve. If you don't want your local subnet to be trusted, in the Known networks section double-click the network name and change its type from "Home or office network" to "Public network".

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I have two different gateway connection. 192.168.1.1 and 192.168.11.1

I want to block 192.168.11.1 gateway it is possible?

Wireless gateway is 192.168.11.1 and i want wireless not access local pc-s ( 192.168.1.1 ) 

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Go into Eset's firewall settings and post a screen shot of your "Connected Networks" on the PC with IP address 192.168.1.1.

Edited by itman
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Lets start by getting our terminology straight. In a home/work group network, the gateway is the device that directly interfaces with your ISP. That is either a router, a modem, or device that is a combination of both.

Your screen shot shows what I believe are two PC network adapters; one an Ethernet connection for a PC using the local scope IPv4 address of 192.168.1.1 and another PC wireless network adapter with an IP address of 192.168.11.1. I believe the second IP address 192.168.11.1 connection is a duplicate. Eset does this at times; usually when something has affected TCP status like a IPv4 TCP reset or the like. Compare the details of both those connections and if they show identical data, delete one of them.

Pertaining to your original question as to whether the wireless IP 192.168.11.1 connection can access other PC's on the network it is part of, the answer is no as long as that connection is set to the Eset "Public" network profile. In that mode, the PC will only be allowed access to itself; the router; its local link IPv6 gateway if applicable i.e. again the router; DNS servers on the router or manually assigned; the Internet; and its localhost adapter.

I am curious about that 192.168.11.1 wireless address. Is that a statically assigned address? Most home routers use DHCP to assign IP addresses in the range of 192.168.1.0 - 192.168.1.255.

Edited by itman
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I am also posting a link to details on Windows HomeGroup: https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/17145/windows-homegroup-from-start-to-finish

 

You basically control what PC's on your home network can access on your PC via permissions settings. If you don't want the wireless PC to access files on your Ethernet connected PC, you basically don't grant it permission to do so.

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