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problem updating ESET v9 product on Windows XP SP3 x32


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The problem with the update of the ESET v9 product on Windows XP SP3 x32 has been observed since yesterday.

09/28/2022 04:58:10 PM Update An error occurred while downloading update files. NT AUTHORITY\SYSTEM


Today continues.
09/29/2022 5:39:56 AM Update An error occurred while downloading update files. NT AUTHORITY\SYSTEM

Confirmed on multiple hits. Installing the certificate did not help.

We can add ESET Log Collector logs. if needed.

 

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This is disappointing, but not unexpected.  The problem is that I despise Windows 10 and can only barely tolerate Windows 7.

As ESET 9 was probably the only AV that could allow me to use the OS that I preferred, I gladly renewed without "shopping" for alternatives.  Now ... nothing to stop me from looking for another vendor.  Too bad after 15 years using this product.

By the way, I'm on my XP box using RDP to access a Win7 "drone" to use Firefox.  I have needed this for some time to access some websites, such as my bank, that cut off XP with claims of "safety Issues."  Seriously, they wouldn't know a safety issue if one smacked them in the head.  I have not had a single issue with XP that ESET NOD32 has not dealt with cleanly in 15 years.  In the last 10, I can't recall seeing a detection that wasn't me playing with something that MS doesn't like, so the AV community tries to kill it.

So please don't tell me my XP is not "safe."  It is as safe as the user makes it.  I know, I know ... the vast majority of users do not have my knowledge and experience and need corporations to look out for them.  But when self-serving behemoths like MS do that, they sure seem to be looking to enhance their own revenue.  I would have paid for a more compact and efficient version of XP with a consistent user interface that isn't trying to look like Apple.

I think letting the technically capable think for themselves would not be a bad thing.  But what do I know?  I've only been "doing" computer stuff since 1972.

It was good run.  Thank you ESET for hanging on this long.  Maybe I'll stick with you.  Depends on how much you raise your prices in our greed driven economy.

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Actually, Eset has shutdown support including sig. updates for all consumer products prior to ver. 10 regardless of OS version used:

Eset_Terminated.thumb.png.cd6ac0923d5b08ac296aad1a6c6ac755.png

 

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On 9/30/2022 at 6:57 AM, Ira Kalmus said:

This is disappointing, but not unexpected.  The problem is that I despise Windows 10 and can only barely tolerate Windows 7.

As ESET 9 was probably the only AV that could allow me to use the OS that I preferred, I gladly renewed without "shopping" for alternatives.  Now ... nothing to stop me from looking for another vendor.  Too bad after 15 years using this product.

By the way, I'm on my XP box using RDP to access a Win7 "drone" to use Firefox.  I have needed this for some time to access some websites, such as my bank, that cut off XP with claims of "safety Issues."  Seriously, they wouldn't know a safety issue if one smacked them in the head.  I have not had a single issue with XP that ESET NOD32 has not dealt with cleanly in 15 years.  In the last 10, I can't recall seeing a detection that wasn't me playing with something that MS doesn't like, so the AV community tries to kill it.

So please don't tell me my XP is not "safe."  It is as safe as the user makes it.  I know, I know ... the vast majority of users do not have my knowledge and experience and need corporations to look out for them.  But when self-serving behemoths like MS do that, they sure seem to be looking to enhance their own revenue.  I would have paid for a more compact and efficient version of XP with a consistent user interface that isn't trying to look like Apple.

I think letting the technically capable think for themselves would not be a bad thing.  But what do I know?  I've only been "doing" computer stuff since 1972.

It was good run.  Thank you ESET for hanging on this long.  Maybe I'll stick with you.  Depends on how much you raise your prices in our greed driven economy.

I understand your point but for me personally there's always a risk when using a non supported OS. It's not patched anymore and so when something does get found it puts everyone who uses it at risk.

An AV might be able to potentially help but I've always felt it's a prison with a hole in the fence. You can have security that is good but nothing changes the fact there's a gapping hole in the fence.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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On 9/30/2022 at 8:57 AM, Ira Kalmus said:

This is disappointing, but not unexpected.  The problem is that I despise Windows 10 and can only barely tolerate Windows 7.

As ESET 9 was probably the only AV that could allow me to use the OS that I preferred, I gladly renewed without "shopping" for alternatives.  Now ... nothing to stop me from looking for another vendor.  Too bad after 15 years using this product.

By the way, I'm on my XP box using RDP to access a Win7 "drone" to use Firefox.  I have needed this for some time to access some websites, such as my bank, that cut off XP with claims of "safety Issues."  Seriously, they wouldn't know a safety issue if one smacked them in the head.  I have not had a single issue with XP that ESET NOD32 has not dealt with cleanly in 15 years.  In the last 10, I can't recall seeing a detection that wasn't me playing with something that MS doesn't like, so the AV community tries to kill it.

So please don't tell me my XP is not "safe."  It is as safe as the user makes it.  I know, I know ... the vast majority of users do not have my knowledge and experience and need corporations to look out for them.  But when self-serving behemoths like MS do that, they sure seem to be looking to enhance their own revenue.  I would have paid for a more compact and efficient version of XP with a consistent user interface that isn't trying to look like Apple.

I think letting the technically capable think for themselves would not be a bad thing.  But what do I know?  I've only been "doing" computer stuff since 1972.

It was good run.  Thank you ESET for hanging on this long.  Maybe I'll stick with you.  Depends on how much you raise your prices in our greed driven economy.

But after all it's better to stop sticking with XP, it won't receive any kind of updates not even 1bytes so it's just like a house that is getting older by time and getting broken more and more

Linux is a good option if you don't want any kind of newer Windows versions

Linux mint cinnamon is designed to look like a Windows , you can give it a try without installing.

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5 hours ago, Nightowl said:

But after all it's better to stop sticking with XP, it won't receive any kind of updates not even 1bytes so it's just like a house that is getting older by time and getting broken more and more

Linux is a good option if you don't want any kind of newer Windows versions

Linux mint cinnamon is designed to look like a Windows , you can give it a try without installing.

Only problem is Eset does not offer home protection for Eset users anymore but I do agree no one should really use XP anymore. 

I've came across people who use old OS's for playing old games that are hard to work on modern systems but usually these people have these completely offline and used for nothing else

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Hello,

Microsoft ended support for Windows XP eight years ago in 2014 and Microsoft Windows 7 two years ago in 2020.  Historically, ESET has historically provided support for operating systems for some time after their developer has ceased to support them, but keep in mind this has been to allow customers time to finalize replacement with a supported operating system. 

ESET cannot support EOL operating systems indefinitely; it gets harder and harder each year to maintain supplies of obsolete hardware and software from multiple parties needed to develop and test under those old operating system versions.  Even virtualized machines are not a forever solution, as they can run into compatibility issues when that vendor ends support for the versions being used.  One can also run into issues when trying to maintain long-since-deprecated APIs, code around limitations in memory structures and processes across so many different versions of Windows.

Back in 2018, I wrote a paper and accompanying blog post, The Last Windows XP Security White Paper, which contained something along the lines of 48 pages of information on how to reduce risk if you had systems still running Windows XP.  Since then, some of the resources I mentioned, both from Microsoft and third-parties, are no longer around.  If there's one key takeaway I had from the experience of crafting that, it was that computers running EOL operating systems should not be connected to a network, let alone the internet.  Despite what security software companies like ESET can do to protect against malware, any underlying vulnerabilities are not going to be patched by Microsoft, and that means there's a finite amount of protection which can be done.

ESET has offered paid post-EOL custom support packages for various versions of its software in the past, but that's more geared towards our business programs where someone needed to protect equipment  like gas pumps, printing presses, CNC machinery, sheet metal presses, scientific equipment like centrifuges, electron microscopes and so forth.  When the cost of replacing equipment like that runs into the hundreds of thousands to millions of dollars, customers with that kind of investment sometimes need extra time to replace it and get employees trained on the new technology.  It's not the kind of service that can be made available outside the enterprise because of the costs involved.  I'm not even sure if we still offer those types of custom support packages—the last time I was involved with one was for a pharmaceutical company that was running NOD32 v2.70 on Windows NT 4.0, and that was over a decade ago.

I know a lot of people don't like upgrading to new versions of Windows because it changes the UI they are comfortable with, but there are all sorts of third-party skinning apps and start menu replacements that make newer versions of Windows look like older versions, so that's one way to get around having to learn a new UI.

Microsoft has announced they will be supporting Windows 10 until at least October 2025, and no EOL has yet been announced for Windows 11, so either of these would be good versions of Windows to look at upgrading to from no longer unsupported versions of Windows.

Regards,

Aryeh Goretsky
 

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A real shame, it was valuable to have recent protection for XP and Vista, whether 'edge' use machines like a beefy i7, or just old. So there's no point renewing ESET licenses for me.

It was also very abrupt - perhaps was noted somewhere or at some stage, but I had to come here to find out what I hoped wasn't true. There's only a couple of months left on my licences so I won't worry about refunds (irrespective of T&Cs, in my country it's not legal for a vendor to bill (or have billed) for a product or service which doesn't function / is not fit for purpose advertised).

It has been a worthy product with advantages outweighing occasional frustrations over the past 17 years, now forced to say goodbye :(  

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Hello,

You may wish to take a look at the Windows XP whitepaper I linked to above.  Many of the recommendations there are also applicable to Microsoft Windows Vista and Windows 7.  They can even be applied to current versions of Windows like Windows 10 and Windows 11, for that matter.

I do not know the exact dates and details, but there has been an extensive notification campaign going on for several years now, with in-product messaging as well as emails to customers and their distributors.  It is entirely possible these were not seen for whatever reason (notifications closed and dismissed, emails marked as spam, etc.), but ESET notifications did go out.

If you are due a refund for your license based on your country's consumer protection laws you are certainly entitled to request it.  Contact the local ESET office or distributor in your country and explain the situation to them.

Regards,

Aryeh Goretsky
 

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On 10/4/2022 at 1:38 AM, Aryeh Goretsky said:

Back in 2018, I wrote a paper and accompanying blog post, The Last Windows XP Security White Paper, which contained something along the lines of 48 pages of information on how to reduce risk if you had systems still running Windows XP. 

I don't use XP since ages , but thanks for the read mate.

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On 10/6/2022 at 5:17 AM, Aryeh Goretsky said:

You may wish to take a look at the Windows XP whitepaper I linked to above.  Many of the recommendations there are also applicable to Microsoft Windows Vista and Windows 7.  They can even be applied to current versions of Windows like Windows 10 and Windows 11, for that matter.

Thanks, read the whitepaper. Most of those things I have already done, or know. But it lacks some reality for my situation and experience - there is another side to its arguments. Eg an SSD with good GC does not slow down "even to speeds slower than those of hard disk drives" due to lack of TRIM, but a file with 10k fragments does in practice so still needs some defragmentation. The paper pushes need for NAT firewalls, but these are near-ubiquitous in 'power user' situations, so being connected to the internet to upgrade is a non-event. "Vulnerable to attack" can be interpreted different ways - while technically true (and the Right Thing for a security company to say), in objective reality (statistically) is a bit misleading as to what actually will, or can happen. The reality is all machines are at nonzero risk (which many people consider "significant"), as the continual stream of urgent patches to modern OSs proves. Windows' (all versions afaik) behaviour itself limits security, eg disallowing multiple usernames for network shares limits fine-grained access, leading to ad-hoc networks using unsecured shares or wide access (exposing 1TB of business data via a single share). That (the ransomware hole), dodgy software (viruses, trojans, bad web scripts) and outright social manipulation, is how things get in, as I see it - the fact is there are many things worse for security than a decision to run an old OS somewhere.

And that is where (and why) a good antivirus is good at mopping up the many extant risks that remain irrespective of OS version or any single setup issue - even if it never actually triggers on anything.

On 10/6/2022 at 5:17 AM, Aryeh Goretsky said:

I do not know the exact dates and details, but there has been an extensive notification campaign going on for several years now, with in-product messaging as well as emails to customers and their distributors.  It is entirely possible these were not seen for whatever reason (notifications closed and dismissed, emails marked as spam, etc.), but ESET notifications did go out.

I looked into this: I had desktop notifications turned off, from memory because it was popping up orange about end of life every other day (without actually doing anything for months or perhaps years). In this circumstance I think turning them off was the only thing to do (given that the product was bought for XP and Vista). I left alert windows and in-product messaging turned on. Also I'm as certain as I can be there were zero email communications. I was unaware of any specific dates, and would have been very alert to anything specific, which is why it came as a surprise.

But I did know the general situation in coming year(s), and am glad for the support that did exist this many years on.

On 10/6/2022 at 5:17 AM, Aryeh Goretsky said:

If you are due a refund for your license based on your country's consumer protection laws you are certainly entitled to request it.  Contact the local ESET office or distributor in your country and explain the situation to them.

Glad to hear ESET's stance on refunds based on consumer protection laws. It's not worth it for 2 months, but good to know it would be an option if I needed it. I'm more worried about the loss of function.

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It's always better to step away from an Operating System that is out of support even if that was a phone or a computer or whatever may hold your personal information and digital life.

If you are not into Windows 10, then your best bet would be Linux, atleast you would get updates and you can still get ESET for it and protect it, and since most games now doesn't even run on XP and 7 and those systems doesn't receive any kind of updates , you better of with some other operating system.

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On 10/9/2022 at 3:33 PM, itman said:

As far as I am aware of, the only AV vendor product with a firewall that still supports Win XP is Kaspersky: https://support.kaspersky.com/us/common/compatibility/15479

Interesting, although their main site shows it's Win 7 and up. Similar to COMODO from what I can see. Only option seems to be to try, which is complicated by AV software being (necessarily?) invasive. I have a couple of good firewalls - one of the biggest challenges is protecting against data leaks.

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On 10/9/2022 at 9:49 AM, Nightowl said:

It's always better to step away from an Operating System that is out of support ...

I understand the sentiment, but it's not literally true of course. There will always be situations where it is unwise or impossible to abandon either a running system or working hardware. A simple example might be an old XP laptop that gets used as a serial terminal and occasional chip programmer in a development environment - an internet connection (NAT firewalled) will do this no harm on its own (if not used for any type of gratuitous web browsing etc). It could be replaced sure, but the troubles that this might bring will not be "always better".

On 10/9/2022 at 9:49 AM, Nightowl said:

If you are not into Windows 10, then your best bet would be Linux, atleast you would get updates and you can still get ESET for it and protect it, and since most games now doesn't even run on XP and 7 and those systems doesn't receive any kind of updates , you better of with some other operating system.

I wanted to not like Windows 10 for its spying and considered going fully with Linux for that reason, but after getting a couple of laptops with Win 10, I think it's ok - I actually quite like its usability and ability to help or get out of the way when needed. I back-graded from 7 (purchased 2nd day it came out) to XP because there were core usability things it broke so badly with no fixes (at the time) that I couldn't use it for work. But I still do use XP in places I possibly should not - it works fine for what it used to do, but is extremely limited in its ability to run new software like you say. Security is a big issue, but not a problem (not in the way people assume) in my experience with XP well beyond EOL.

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