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How to defend against an intrusion with an IP of 0.0.0.0 ?


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My router has been hammering by an IP 0.0.0.0 and soabc.jpg.1c49291e1fd51f9cbbda599a3aed9425.jpg.

Is there a way to escape from them, or find out who is behind this 0.0.0.0 ?

Thanks in advance.

Edited by Daidai
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The address 0.0.0.0 is a non-routable meta-address used to designate an invalid, unknown or non-applicable target.

Please be more specific as to what attacks you mean. Do you see attacks from 89.248.16.0/24 in your router's log?

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No! please don't type the numbers, please use the picture I provided, I don't want to alert that IP owner and attack my router more!

My router says soabc.jpg.38881ec2b9e4136acd26a6800f6e23d0.jpg is doing a TCP SYN flood hundreds of time per day!

0.0.0.0 is performing a fraggle attack to destination 255.255.255.255 at port 68.

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Your "mixing apples and oranges" in this posting.

You mention a fraggle attack. This attack is described as:

Quote

Fraggle

A Fraggle attack is very similar to the Smurf attack, except that it uses the User Datagram Protocol (UDP) rather than the more common Transmission Control Protocol (TCP). It is less common than Smurf attacks. Both Fraggle and Smurf attacks, are starting to become outdated and are commonly stopped by most modern routers and firewalls.

Fraggle attacks can usually be blocked by simply blocking ports 7 (Echo port) and port 19 (another commonly used Fraggle exploitable port) in your router/firewall.

https://www.speedguide.net/articles/how-to-stop-denial-of-service-dos-attacks-3316

Additional ref. here: https://www.okta.com/identity-101/fraggle-attack/

Next, you mention a TCP sync flood attack but reference port 68. Ports 67,68 are only used by IPv4 DHCP initialization processing using the UDP protocol. Therefore, a TCP sync flood attack against port 68 would be highly doubtful.

Assuming you are using an ISP provided router/gateway, do a hard reset of it which will reset it back to ISP initialized values. If the router/gateway admin GUI interface is not password protected, create a strong password for it. Note that many routers/gateways use a default password of admin which is easily guessed by an external based hacker. Otherwise, change the existing password to another new strong password.

As far as what a strong password is:

Quote

CHARACTERISTICS OF STRONG PASSWORDS

  • At least 12 characters - the more characters, the better
  • A mixture of both uppercase and lowercase letters
  • A mixture of letters and numbers 
  • Inclusion of at least one special character, e.g., ! @ # ? ]

Note: do not use < or > in your password, as both can cause problems in Web browsers

However, use of < or > is acceptable for a router/gateway password.

Also, avoid using your resident city name, birth date, etc. as part of the password. The more random the characters used, the stronger the password. An example of a strong router/gateway password:

>B3gB!<^RZ$WJ-gF

Edited by itman
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Sorry for the confusion,

1. soabc.jpg.d594c6b4ab7d575b693b721e438cd350.jpg is doing a TCP SYN flood at random ports. 

2.   0.0.0.0 is doing  a fraggle attack to destination 255.255.255.255 at port 68. (I just type what the router tells)

3. I did reset the router, changed default adminstration login password. I am confident it is a strong password.

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Posted (edited)

I forgot to ask, how come the attacker's address is 0.0.0.0 ?

Please help, I don't want my network got breached again.

Edited by Daidai
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31 minutes ago, Daidai said:

I forgot to ask, how come the attacker's address is 0.0.0.0 ?

Quote

On Client Computers

PCs and other client devices normally show an address of 0.0.0.0 when not connected to a TCP/IP network. A device might give itself this address by default whenever it is offline.

It might also be automatically assigned by DHCP in the case of address assignment failures. When set with this address, a device cannot communicate with any other devices on that network.

0.0.0.0 can also theoretically be set as a device's subnet mask rather than its IP address. However, a subnet mask with this value has no practical purpose. Both the IP address and network mask are typically assigned 0.0.0.0 on a client.

Depending on the way it's used, firewall or router software might use 0.0.0.0 to indicate that every IP address should be blocked (or allowed).

https://www.lifewire.com/four-zero-ip-address-818384

Since you reference port 68, it appears what I underlined above is applicable in your case. Not out of consideration here is there might be a hardware or firmware issue with your router.

Edited by itman
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5 hours ago, Daidai said:

0.0.0.0 is doing  a fraggle attack to destination 255.255.255.255 at port 68. (I just type what the router tells)

Note that the above would be valid if the destination port was 67; refer to the following:

Quote

When the lease expires and the client still cannot reach the DHCP server by unicast, the DHCP client will unconfigure the current IP address, and then will start the DHCP request process from the beginning, using broadcasts so the packets will be addressed 0.0.0.0:68 -> 255.255.255.255:67

Next, note the following:

Quote

Almost any dhcp traffic from or to external sources can be considered highly suspicious and likely represents an attack.

Action:

Firewall port 68 inbound and outbound where possible. DHCP traffic should not go beyond subnets, unless a dhcp relay is in use and then only the DHCP relay's traffic should be allowed. Most clients send DHCP requests as from the IP address 255.255.255.255 to the address 0.0.0.0 (in most cases they do not have an IP address currently).

https://kb.eventtracker.com/evtpass/evtPages/PortNo_68_bootpclient_56538.asp

I can't help but think this is related to your obsession in blocking Eset connections to Google DNS servers and changes you made to Eset default firewall rules to accomplish this.

Edited by itman
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When using proxies it is possible to spoof the last address that is forwarded to the destination IP address. They could be spoofing the last address so that it shows 0.0.0.0. It helps mask the attacker's exit node, making it more difficult to block the attacker's address. It still may be possible to see the attackers exit node address with a good packet sniffer like Wireshark.

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8 hours ago, cutting_edgetech said:

When using proxies it is possible to spoof the last address that is forwarded to the destination IP address. They could be spoofing the last address so that it shows 0.0.0.0. It helps mask the attacker's exit node, making it more difficult to block the attacker's address. It still may be possible to see the attackers exit node address with a good packet sniffer like Wireshark.

Thanks, I will try and see.

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11 hours ago, itman said:

Note that the above would be valid if the destination port was 67; refer to the following:

Next, note the following:

https://kb.eventtracker.com/evtpass/evtPages/PortNo_68_bootpclient_56538.asp

I can't help but think this is related to your obsession in blocking Eset connections to Google DNS servers and changes you made to Eset default firewall rules to accomplish this.

This happens even no device is connected to the router, so it is not related to ESET firewall.

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16 hours ago, itman said:

0.0.0.0 is doing  a fraggle attack to destination 255.255.255.255 at port 68. (I just type what the router tells)

Every instance I found of this activity on the Internet resolved to being a false positive caused by the user's ISP.

Contact your ISP about this activity.

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