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Hey guys,

 

I have been doing some research and I come across things that av companies are allowing government level spyware though (whitelisting them).  Is eset one of these companies?

 

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Really nothing new.

I remember some time ago it was discovered select American AV vendors at the time were letting NSA stuff  (Yeah .....) sneak by.

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We detect spying and other malware regardless of its origin. If I recall correctly, the CEO of ESET stated this publicly in the past.

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Posted (edited)

Marcos is correct here. NSA doesn't approach any AV vendors to get malware "whitelisted" Not any more anyway. Both they and AV vendors have realized it's not a good road to go down. Even when the NSA keeps known exploits to themselves is not happening anymore. The NSA caught a lot of backlash behind the  scenes from MS over "EternalBlue".  Their involvement in WannaCry, or WannaCrypt, has given them a less than positive view. If anything things have flip-flopped a lot in the last few years and the NSA now helps the AV industry and MS make things more secure. Research the ShadowBrokers, the Equation Group, EternalBlue, WannaCry if you'd like more info on this topic

https://blogs.microsoft.com/on-the-issues/2017/05/14/need-urgent-collective-action-keep-people-safe-online-lessons-last-weeks-cyberattack/#sm.0001f04ed012qeeaht7p5g0ous47x

https://www.wired.com/story/eternalblue-leaked-nsa-spy-tool-hacked-world/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Shadow_Brokers

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/EternalBlue

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Equation_Group

Edited by NewbyUser

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Hey,

Yes but what goes on behind the scenes is a different story.

I know norton still does.

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They shouldn't be. It's really not needed. There are many ways to get the needed access/information without compromising everyone's security. Gaining assistance from ISP's is much more effective and easier for the Intelligence side. From the enforcement side, a warrant to an ISP or Apple, for example, for iCloud Backups, is amazingly effective.

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42 minutes ago, NewbyUser said:

Marcos is correct here. NSA doesn't approach any AV vendors to get malware "whitelisted" Not any more anyway.

Correct. They do so without their knowledge or consent. Eset was on the list:

NSA Spied On Non-American Anti-Virus Companies: https://www.forbes.com/sites/thomasbrewster/2015/06/22/foreign-av-companies-targeted-by-nsa/#d35cac75b8c3

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5 minutes ago, itman said:

Correct. They do so without their knowledge or consent. Eset was on the list:

NSA Spied On Non-American Anti-Virus Companies: https://www.forbes.com/sites/thomasbrewster/2015/06/22/foreign-av-companies-targeted-by-nsa/#d35cac75b8c3

Correct. But I can tell you this endeavor was abandoned even before it became public. Wasn't that effective and required too much effort for minimal return.

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Just now, itman said:

In a "tit-for-tat," the Russians do it against American AV vendors:

Elite Russian Hackers Claim To Have Breached Three Major U.S. Antivirus Makers: https://www.forbes.com/sites/leemathews/2019/05/09/russian-hackers-breach-antivirus-makers/#76ceef3b1db2

Yes, Russia and their "Bears" are an entirely different subject.

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Given the shenanigans the U.S. gov. courtesy of the Israeli's caught Kaspersky in, I would say foreign AV vendors are still under surveillance.

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3 minutes ago, itman said:

Given the shenanigans the U.S. gov. courtesy of the Israeli's caught Kaspersky in, I would say foreign AV vendors are still under surveillance.

Not really the place for it, but there is the equivalent of "script kiddies" on the blue side, or white side as well. They want everything easy. That's where stuff like that comes from. Taking the easy way. 

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Posted (edited)

Additionally, Eset has always taken the stance they have, Malware is Malware, regardless of who writes it. 

From way back in Stuxnet times;

https://www.eset.com/fileadmin/eset/US/resources/docs/white-papers/whitepapers-malware-risks-of-weaponizing-code.pdf

This is also a very good read regarding this topic and still applicable today.

Edited by NewbyUser

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Posted (edited)
27 minutes ago, BeanSlappers said:

All governments are just as bad as one another.

A philosophical issue way beyond the scope of this forum here, but governments are made up of people, and are neither good or evil. It is the nature of the people that brings the problem. Typically greed or fear are the greatest driving forces of what a government or it's society becomes when they turn negative.

Edited by NewbyUser

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Posted (edited)
13 hours ago, NewbyUser said:

Their involvement in WannaCry, or WannaCrypt, has given them a less than positive view. If anything things have flip-flopped a lot in the last few years and the NSA now helps the AV industry and MS make things more secure

 

Do you really think the NSA will help any AV vendor or Microsoft?

Nah they won't and they still have their own backdoors to use against AVs or to infect Operating Systems , whether that was Linux or Microsoft or they can craft their own one at the moment.

This is their job , this is a spy agency , that supposed to protect the nation instead it spies on the nation.

About Kaspersky and the American government,  well Kaspersky has done it's job in that moment , whether we like it or not and has done it perfectly.

And as an AV company ,  all malware should be specified as Malware even if it was made by the Gods.

Microsoft is still crying from their WannaCry.

Added some text from the article  :


 

Quote

 

On the hitlist of “Project CAMBERDADA”, an NSA-led initiative, were Russian giant Kaspersky, Finnish firm F-Secure, Romania’s BitDefender, Germany’s Avira, Slovakia’s ESET, South Korean giant AhnLab, as well as Czech vendors AVG and Avast. Some firm’s may have been on the list purely because of their association with Kaspersky. Israel’s Check Point, which licenses the Kaspersky anti-virus engine for its consumer product, ZoneAlarm, was also a target. Older versions of F-Secure also used the Kaspersky signature database, which contained lists of blacklisted malware.

 

GCHQ appears to have targeted Russian anti-virus provider Kaspersky, whilst the NSA has led an... [+]

But American anti-virus leaders McAfee and Symantec were not on the list. Neither was Sophos, the UK’s best-known anti-virus provider. All three have numerous ex-government employees and have close working relationships with intelligence and law enforcement agencies, from the NSA to the FBI to the European Cyber Crime Center.

 

It is a funny policy , that says in more simple words , join us or we harass you and spy on you.

Who the hell still uses mcAfee these days , even it's ex-owner released a video to stop using it :lol:

Edited by Nightowl

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Posted (edited)

Sorry but NSA, GCSB, Five eyes, and prism, all have there hands in this,  Microsoft, Google, and NSA have agreements, which allows NSA to have a nosy.  NSA will never help with covering flaws in Microsoft fully, because they would want access into everything, but then again they already do.  It's all been since this spy initiative about hunting terrorist etc, or some lie like that.  So when ever I hear something new, I go into a deep dive for info, but I wanted to give Eset a chance to tell me the truth be for I deep dive in this too.

See, I'm about privacy, like I think intruding into someones life is not ok, like hacking there stuff, just to get information.  When you ask someone who is the main ones that wants privacy, the answer you would get is criminals etc.  But there are people out there who like their privacy too.  I am one of them.  Now I am not doing anything wrong, totally not.  But I like having that privacy of my own.  If someone was to hack my PC the most they would find of my computer is duckduckgo searchers, trademe, forums such as this, and games.  Everything else that is personal is not even on my computer at all.  I don't see a point to keep private things on my PC.

Edited by BeanSlappers

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12 hours ago, BeanSlappers said:

Sorry but NSA, GCSB, Five eyes, and prism, all have there hands in this,  Microsoft, Google, and NSA have agreements, which allows NSA to have a nosy.  NSA will never help with covering flaws in Microsoft fully, because they would want access into everything, but then again they already do.  It's all been since this spy initiative about hunting terrorist etc, or some lie like that.  So when ever I hear something new, I go into a deep dive for info, but I wanted to give Eset a chance to tell me the truth be for I deep dive in this too.

See, I'm about privacy, like I think intruding into someones life is not ok, like hacking there stuff, just to get information.  When you ask someone who is the main ones that wants privacy, the answer you would get is criminals etc.  But there are people out there who like their privacy too.  I am one of them.  Now I am not doing anything wrong, totally not.  But I like having that privacy of my own.  If someone was to hack my PC the most they would find of my computer is duckduckgo searchers, trademe, forums such as this, and games.  Everything else that is personal is not even on my computer at all.  I don't see a point to keep private things on my PC.

The problem is that everything is flawed.

As Marcos himself had said no AV can ever be 100 percent. Flaws will always exist and if cyber criminals and governments find them they probably won't report them and actually use them. It all depends i suppose on the risk e.g. if a government agency finds a flaw that could put themselves at risk they may need to report it.

Its one of the reasons I dislike the idea of backdoors purposely placed by organisations at the bequest of governments. People can say the if you've got nothing to hide but they tend to forget if a backdoor does exist there's nothing stopping other people finding it.

I do also think some people however worry too much and also want stuff that needs information without giving information.

Take live grid for example. If people avoid sharing information then it becomes harder for eset and other AVs to offer quick responses to things such as new malware because sometimes they have to see it in the wild first. Some want all these features but with a lot of things you need to make compromises.

I've seen people wanting searches e.g. on mobile devices be more personalised  e.g local results without giving personal information and that makes no sense

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