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Custerinky

Gryphon Router

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Hi all, I have been with ESET for the past year and find it quiet, efficient and effective, thank you.

I have also seen the Gryphon Router around  and read that ESET is it's featured protection. My question is if it has been considered for marketing here. It seems to have very good ratings. Thank you

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It is true that ESET is used on some Gryphon routers to filter URLs, however, your question is not clear. This forum is not about marketing but sharing knowledge, helping with issues, etc.

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This Mesh WiFi Router, Internet Security, IOT device could be beneficial for ESET subscribers in protecting their entire household of smart devices, much like other ones that are currently available worldwide. It seems to be a popular product where sold, enhances and expands overall security in homes as well as businesses.

I see it as a plus for ESET subscribers in protecting all of their internet connected devices, along with complimentary installed ESET software. Just a thought, thanks. 

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7 hours ago, Custerinky said:

This Mesh WiFi Router, Internet Security, IOT device could be beneficial for ESET subscribers in protecting their entire household of smart devices, much like other ones that are currently available worldwide. It seems to be a popular product where sold, enhances and expands overall security in homes as well as businesses.

I see it as a plus for ESET subscribers in protecting all of their internet connected devices, along with complimentary installed ESET software. Just a thought, thanks. 

Some AVs are  now supplying their own Routers with their own built in security as packages. Bitdefender for example has their BOX router. I did bring this up a while back and I'm sure someone from Eset said it was something they had been looking into although I think they had no immediate future plans. With the issues with IoT I can see the usefulness of something like this and not forgetting eset has also had the connected home monitor tool for a few years now.

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2 hours ago, peteyt said:

Some AVs are  now supplying their own Routers with their own built in security as packages. Bitdefender for example has their BOX router. I did bring this up a while back and I'm sure someone from Eset said it was something they had been looking into although I think they had no immediate future plans. With the issues with IoT I can see the usefulness of something like this and not forgetting eset has also had the connected home monitor tool for a few years now.

Yes peteyt, I've also found that F-Secure who has the SENSE Box Router since 2017 has now signed a deal with ZyXel and will feature F-Secure firmware. I purchased a Bitdefender Box a couple of years ago and it worked well for awhile but then began losing server sync and connections etc. So I basically just put it aside as it became too time consuming trying to reset and keep up with.

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57 minutes ago, Custerinky said:

Yes peteyt, I've also found that F-Secure who has the SENSE Box Router since 2017 has now signed a deal with ZyXel and will feature F-Secure firmware. I purchased a Bitdefender Box a couple of years ago and it worked well for awhile but then began losing server sync and connections etc. So I basically just put it aside as it became too time consuming trying to reset and keep up with.

I do see they released a box 2. 

The only thing is would home users change their routers. Most just use the standard one e.g. their isps use. I suppose If it's easy to setup and has better security than standard ones people would probably use them

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Yes, certainly would use if they could minimize the interaction required to keep it stable and secure. We live in a rural area so all we have access to is ADSL. My Box connected with our provider's ZyXel Modem/Router.

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Hello,

ESET does have a few OEM partnerships with companies like agreements like Gryphon Online Safety, Ltd. for its router and ClevX, LLC for removable media security, however, it is usually up to each OEM partner to do their own sales, marketing and branding.  There may be some joint PR activities, but usually in deals like these ESET is something of a "silent partner," providing the partner with a particular technology or set of technologies which they then go out and sell.  I just mentioned those two as examples because they actually mention ESET on their websites.  Some OEM partners choose to mention their ESET partnership, others do not.

This is a little different from ESET's Technology Alliance, which we have allied with companies like GreyCortex, Safetica and Xopero to provide a complementary technology, such as traffic analysis, DLP or backups.

You can learn more about these types of activities via the Business Development section of ESET's web site, but as they are primarily sales activities, they are not normally going to come up for discussion here.  As my colleague @Marcos noted above, we're primarily a venue for support and sharing information in the forum.

Regards,

Aryeh Goretsky

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24 minutes ago, Aryeh Goretsky said:

Hello,

ESET does have a few OEM partnerships with companies like agreements like Gryphon Online Safety, Ltd. for its router and ClevX, LLC for removable media security, however, it is usually up to each OEM partner to do their own sales, marketing and branding.  There may be some joint PR activities, but usually in deals like these ESET is something of a "silent partner," providing the partner with a particular technology or set of technologies which they then go out and sell.  I just mentioned those two as examples because they actually mention ESET on their websites.  Some OEM partners choose to mention their ESET partnership, others do not.

This is a little different from ESET's Technology Alliance, which we have allied with companies like GreyCortex, Safetica and Xopero to provide a complementary technology, such as traffic analysis, DLP or backups.

You can learn more about these types of activities via the Business Development section of ESET's web site, but as they are primarily sales activities, they are not normally going to come up for discussion here.  As my colleague @Marcos noted above, we're primarily a venue for support and sharing information in the forum.

Regards,

Aryeh Goretsky

Do you think eset will ever consider their own router for home users like some AVs have started doing which often come with packages?

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Hi Arveh and thank you very much for responding. I find all of this very interesting. It seems these days things are changing at a pace that becomes difficult to keep up with, much less ahead of, especially for a hillbilly from Kentucky like me.

I really didn't expect such a detailed response but it is appreciated. My main thought was the prospect of introducing a IOT device in the near future for ESET subscribers. Thanks again.

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Hello,

Hmm… this is kind of a long answer.  ESET is always looking at all sorts of new (and not-so-new) technologies and how we can better protect people, and the Internet of Things is one of those areas where there are a lot of challenges and a lot of interest.  We have done everything from finding vulnerable devices and reporting them to their vendors (under responsible disclosure guidelines, BTW), as well as looked at the space from the perspective of a higher level overview.  So, from that perspective, ESET does have interest in the space.

But, that said, it is important to understand that there are a lot of non-obvious background activities that go into shipping actual hardware.  My last employer (before I joined ESET in 2005) was a telephony hardware manufacturer that made embedded systems like VoIP handsets, PoE switches, PBXes and the like.  While that may sound dissimilar to an "IoT device" at first glance, they are really largely the same:  General purpose (commodity) hardware and operating systems software that has been highly-optimized and engineered to perform a few set-purpose activities.  In the case of those devices, that involved things like taking and placing calls, handling voicemail, toggling MWI (message waiting indicator) LEDs and connecting to a variety of standards-based (SIP) and proprietary (Cisco) devices. 

To get to all of that, though, the company had to go through all sorts of prototyping to design and then test the hardware, source component suppliers, find printed circuit board manufacturers, assembly partners, etc.  Doing all of that requires having lots of electronics engineering talent, with specialization not just in embedded but telecommunications and networking as well.  You have to design the plastics (or contract that out to a design firm), as well as do things like get certification from various regulatory agencies and safety organizations (FCC, UL, TUV and so forth).  You even have to design crush-proof packaging and foam inserts which is a highly-specialized field. 

Getting device through certification is not always easy (when I left my last employer, they were going through a multi-month long process to get a Bluetooth radio module inside a handset certified for EU use) or cheap.

And, once you've finally got a working, certifiable product, it gets even more complicated.  If you have a physical product like hardware, you have to have physical space for engineers to sit in, warehouse space for inventory, a shipping department, a QA/testing department, an RMA department for analyzing why units failed in the field and repairing them and so forth.  Also, expect to re-spin (revise) your product's hardware several times over its life-cycle to fix bugs in it.  Those will occur, no matter how much you design or test for them.  At my last employer, they had one product with a circuit board on revision H (8th revision) because revisions A though G had flaws in them.  Even something as simple as the Raspberry Pi 4 has design flaws that need to be fixed with a board redesign.

All together, that is a lot of work, and while ESET has engaged in some activities-at-scale before which required some specialized engineering, making an IoT security device is in a different kind of direction than the has historically been in.

That's not to say that you will never see an ESET IoT security device, but just not to expect anything in the near term, because there's a lot of work to do to get into the hardware space.  It may instead be more effective to partner with companies to provide that kind of functionality.  But, that's a discussion far beyond my area of expertise.

Regards,

Aryeh Goretsky

On 12/2/2019 at 7:25 PM, peteyt said:

Do you think ESET will ever consider their own router for home users like some AVs have started doing which often come with packages?

On 12/2/2019 at 7:31 PM, Custerinky said:

Hi Aryeh and thank you very much for responding. I find all of this very interesting. It seems these days things are changing at a pace that becomes difficult to keep up with, much less ahead of, especially for a hillbilly from Kentucky like me.

I really didn't expect such a detailed response but it is appreciated. My main thought was the prospect of introducing a IoT device in the near future for ESET subscribers. Thanks again.

 

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Thank you again Arveh for taking the time to share insight on the importance and challenges faced in producing a competitive IOT device. Marketing one is also a major undertaking.

No doubt to remain competitive, I would think that most all security firms will need to enter the pool at some point. What ESET has now in product, does identify and point out potential network device vulnerabilities, and is one way to help bolster security, however it does not block, to my knowledge any device or filter traffic.

I have a feeling the plastic box of rocks, in some cases, will become a thing of the past. Something integrated into a single solution will become mainstay. Interesting what lies ahead.  

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14 hours ago, Aryeh Goretsky said:

Hello,

Hmm… this is kind of a long answer.  ESET is always looking at all sorts of new (and not-so-new) technologies and how we can better protect people, and the Internet of Things is one of those areas where there are a lot of challenges and a lot of interest.  We have done everything from finding vulnerable devices and reporting them to their vendors (under responsible disclosure guidelines, BTW), as well as looked at the space from the perspective of a higher level overview.  So, from that perspective, ESET does have interest in the space.

But, that said, it is important to understand that there are a lot of non-obvious background activities that go into shipping actual hardware.  My last employer (before I joined ESET in 2005) was a telephony hardware manufacturer that made embedded systems like VoIP handsets, PoE switches, PBXes and the like.  While that may sound dissimilar to an "IoT device" at first glance, they are really largely the same:  General purpose (commodity) hardware and operating systems software that has been highly-optimized and engineered to perform a few set-purpose activities.  In the case of those devices, that involved things like taking and placing calls, handling voicemail, toggling MWI (message waiting indicator) LEDs and connecting to a variety of standards-based (SIP) and proprietary (Cisco) devices. 

To get to all of that, though, the company had to go through all sorts of prototyping to design and then test the hardware, source component suppliers, find printed circuit board manufacturers, assembly partners, etc.  Doing all of that requires having lots of electronics engineering talent, with specialization not just in embedded but telecommunications and networking as well.  You have to design the plastics (or contract that out to a design firm), as well as do things like get certification from various regulatory agencies and safety organizations (FCC, UL, TUV and so forth).  You even have to design crush-proof packaging and foam inserts which is a highly-specialized field. 

Getting device through certification is not always easy (when I left my last employer, they were going through a multi-month long process to get a Bluetooth radio module inside a handset certified for EU use) or cheap.

And, once you've finally got a working, certifiable product, it gets even more complicated.  If you have a physical product like hardware, you have to have physical space for engineers to sit in, warehouse space for inventory, a shipping department, a QA/testing department, an RMA department for analyzing why units failed in the field and repairing them and so forth.  Also, expect to re-spin (revise) your product's hardware several times over its life-cycle to fix bugs in it.  Those will occur, no matter how much you design or test for them.  At my last employer, they had one product with a circuit board on revision H (8th revision) because revisions A though G had flaws in them.  Even something as simple as the Raspberry Pi 4 has design flaws that need to be fixed with a board redesign.

All together, that is a lot of work, and while ESET has engaged in some activities-at-scale before which required some specialized engineering, making an IoT security device is in a different kind of direction than the has historically been in.

That's not to say that you will never see an ESET IoT security device, but just not to expect anything in the near term, because there's a lot of work to do to get into the hardware space.  It may instead be more effective to partner with companies to provide that kind of functionality.  But, that's a discussion far beyond my area of expertise.

Regards,

Aryeh Goretsky

 

 

 

Thanks for the deep insight. Sometimes the things that look and seem simple have a complicated process to get there

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Just want to say thanks again. I've never seen a forum or internet company for that matter, where there is so much help and consideration for subscriber concerns. The whole experience with ESET is pleasant. Please don't change. It is appreciated. 

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