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Preyed Upon


John Ross
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Evening of 4/16/2019 I was attempting to update my Eset license from the Eset form when my computer taken over by some outfit I don't recognize. they told me that Eset was not supporting Windows 7 any longer. And they had a program that will change my computer to accept this new program that will allow Eset to work on windows 7. They then opened my computer to them selves and told me of all the programs that Microsoft was not supporting any longer. After some time they offered me an antivirus program that had all the bells and whistles for $199 for one year, $299 for two years and $499 for three years. They said they would clean my computer and speed up my computer. I told them I would no longer use Eset and I would go else where for an antivirus program.

I got kind of upset over this as I have been a Eset user for a long time and suspicious of the hurry up and sign deal and decided to contact Eset again. I did and was able to buy a new license for 2019. So that thing that happened last night was FUBAR. I haven't an idea how they could just jump in and say that Eset was no longer supporting Windows 7. How can that happen? Oh by the way the operator said he was located in Dayton Ohio. I'd be interested to know if anyone else has this happened too?

 

John Ross

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I'm afraid you fell victim of a scam since you most likely didn't contact ESET through the official website www.eset.com/us that is maintained by ESET, LLC from San Diego. Firstly, ESET still supports Windows 7 and will continue to support it for the next few years. We even still offer v9 which officially supports Windows XP. Secondly, the price for ESET's products is much lower. The price for ESET NOD32 Antivirus for new customers is below $40 and even less if you are purchasing a renewal:

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12 hours ago, John Ross said:

Evening of 4/16/2019 I was attempting to update my Eset license from the Eset form when my computer taken over by some outfit I don't recognize.

I am curious about the "Eset form" you mentioned. Where did this appear from? Was it a popup from your browser for example? In any case, you were obviously redirected to some scam web site. The thing to be established is how this happened. I don't believe the "form" you mentioned was generated from the existing Eset installation GUI.

For future reference in the U.S., you should always renew from this web site: https://www.eset.com/us/renew/

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As they gained access to your machine, after doing an In-depth scan using the REAL ESET and any other (if you wish) second opinion scanner, I would most definitely start changing all passwords. I would also encourage you to password protect your ESET settings https://support.eset.com/kb2782/ to prevent any outsiders from altering/cancelling your security settings. In addition, depending on what you have on your machine, you also might want to consider putting a freeze on your credit with all 3 major credit reporting agencies in the USA. If you go to the FTC's website https://www.ftc.gov/ and look up Free Credit report (it's on the main page), it will direct you to the Annual Credit Report website where you can look up information about your credit and has other good information. I'm with you itman, it had to be a pop-up.

John, to answer your question, this type of thing (fake PC support) happens all too often (DAILY 100s of times) ... it could be a pop-up or a phone call. Some of the latest scams involve Microsoft, saying your license has expired, or they owe you money or "we detected a virus on your machine". They'll load your machine with malware, copy your address book to send more malware to your contacts, use your credit cards and drain your bank account. Microsoft does not call people. If you opened a trouble ticket with them by you calling them at a legitimate number, they MIGHT call you (or not). I also use Win7 and ESET works fine on it.

Should you get a pop-up, do not click on it (never)! To close pop-ups, use the ALT key along with the F4 key. You also might want to review your pop-up setting in your browser.

Good luck:unsure:.

Tom

Edited by TomFace
Grammar correction
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21 minutes ago, TomFace said:

You also might want to review your pop-up setting in your browser.

On this regard, I found IE11's popup blocker disabled after a screen locker like scam incident. It also took a bit of "finagling" to reenable it. I am still trying to figure out how the attacker could disable the popup blocker.

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John, two other thoughts, only use one full time/real time Anti-Virus program (such as EIS, ESSP or Nod32). With A/V programs "the more the merrier" adage does not apply as they could/would conflict. As far as a second opinion scanner, it should be an on-demand, not a full time, scanner (such as HitmanPro or EEK and there are others as well) . Run one scan at a time.

Identity theft, in your case, is a VERY REAL possibility.

Regards,

Tom

Edited by TomFace
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