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Moving from MSE to NOD


Carbonyl
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Hello - A while back I built myself a computer, and at the time I decided to use MSE as the antiviral suite of choice once my system was created. Since then, MSE has slipped noticabley in its detection and protection, and I am interested in replacing it. NOD32 is a highly recommended option that I am considering.

 

HOWEVER: In the past I have had serious DISASTERS of compatibility and stability when trying to remove one AV suite and replace it with another. This leads me to a few questions before I choose to go with NOD.

 

1.) If I choose to remove MSE and install NOD, how can I be positively 100% sure to remove all traces of MSE before installing NOD? If even the slightest scraps linger, I'm sure I'm going to have a headache of crashes, blue screens, and other disasters.

 

2.) I am currently running Sandboxie with specific settings for my web-facing applications. It's currently running with a setting for MSE compatibility. If I remove MSE and install NOD, will I be able to switch Sandboxie over to some kind of NOD mode? Will Sandboxie and NOD get along with each other, or will they cause a huge conflict? I have heard that NOD doesn't like the system level drivers that Sandboxie runs with.

 

3.) How can I know if NOD will have a resource impact on my system? I like MSE because it is lightweight. I primarily use my system for gaming and heavy video editing (Premiere/After Effects), so a drain on the system wouldn't be fun to see. Similarly, if NOD is going to be doing constant read/write to my SSD, it might shorten the lifespan of the drive.

 

Current specs are:

i7-3930

64 GB RAM

Win 7 x64 SP1 (most current)

2x HDD (512 GB SSD, 2 TB Platter HDD)

 

Any information or guidance would be most appreciated. Thanks much.

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Hi Carbonyl,

 

I will try and answer a few of your questions to assist and assist with reassurance.

 

Your first question, can be answered with a decision by you on 2 methods to uninstall MSE completely with no traces remaining.

1. ESET Uninstaller - If you boot to safe mode and run it, it will remove MSE in a manual and non-attentive way. It was built for ESET but also picks up and detects other software suites if found.

2. If you haven't found it yet, we have a malware tools section. I have posted an article in the following thread for removal tools.

https://forum.eset.com/topic/636-uninstallers-removal-tools-for-common-antivirus-software/

If you follow that link, it will lead to ESET's KB which lists most common security suites and the removal tool or site that will lead to an uninstaller tool for said product.

For MSE, it will be here : hxxp://support.microsoft.com/kb/2435760

 

However i do suggest using the traditional method of Add/Remove Programs or Programs and Features if on Vista or 7 .

I can understand going the manual route if you have had bad luck in the past .

 

On your second question, I also have Sandboxie, its a great program, and i don't suggest getting rid of it.

I like to use it to run certain software if i am unsure of it, in the sandbox.

I understand you are using some form of web ve for protection with sandboxie, but i can confidently say that with all the features that Nod32 has with web protection, you most likely no longer need to run the web feature for sandboxie. Maybe on occasion for peace of mind...

 

As far as an SSD goes, i have one myself, and even more delicate, mine is an OCZ Revodrive.

There is nothing wrong with running Nod32 on your SSD. I don't think it makes the large amount of writes you are thinking, or that it would take, to greatly decrease your lifespan. :)

 

ESET is a very lightweight program, small on disk size, and scans very efficiently due to its Smart Optimization technology.

 

If you have any additional inquires, don't hesitate to continue posting. :)

 

Thanks and welcome here, glad you are looking into the good stuff now !

Edited by Arakasi
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3.) I'm concerned about system drag. Some A/V suites are notoriously heavy on resources, and I've heard NOD is getting that way. Can anyone confirm or deny the drain on a system with the latest version of NOD?

 

Current specs are:

i7-3930

64 GB RAM

Win 7 x64 SP1 (most current)

2x HDD (512 GB SSD, 2 TB Platter HDD)

 

 

Using ESET on a 10yr old system works fine and if that's not enough info to kill this rumor then I don't know what is. 

And I can tell by your specs that your PC is not anywhere near that age.

 

I have also heard that ESET is going "downhill" and that the detection and protection is worse than ever  :ph34r:

 

Some people eat to much FUDge these days  :P

 

And FYI you have been offered a 90-day trial from our good friend in your other thread here:  https://www.wilderssecurity.com/showpost.php?p=2334839&postcount=10

 

Welcome back Carbonyl  :)

 

Edited by SweX
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LOL

"-A Heavy product is not the same as a Bloated product and vice versa-"

 

My friend Swex here is an expert on signature phrases. :wub:

 

I like that guys webpage haha. www.betterantivirus.com  :lol:

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LOL

"-A Heavy product is not the same as a Bloated product and vice versa-"

 

My friend Swex here is an expert on signature phrases. :wub:

 

I like that guys webpage haha. www.betterantivirus.com  :lol:

Hey those sigs don't come cheap you know :P  The story behind that particular sig is that I got tired of people saying one thing but meant something totally different. Bloat is about product features(unnecessary features) and the other is what you feel or not feel when using the product. Some people mix these up too often.  :D

 

That domain name is exactly what it is, he is a reseller of a better antivirus.  :lol:

Edited by SweX
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