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BAD_POOL_CALLER 0x000000c2 I think might be related to ESET Internet Security


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I have ESET Internet Security v10.1.204.0 x64 on Windows 10. Every few days, sometimes more often I get BSOD in Windows 10 CU about BAD_POOL_CALLER 0x000000c2. I've searched around and got to this link 

I'm thinking this is related to ESET and very well could be related to their firewall, as suggested doing this SSL filtering. Has this been confirmed by ESET? Can they look into this? I can provide minidump if necessary. I run firewall in interactive mode.

Edited by MarkF
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Has this just started since you installed EIS ?? , as there can be many reasons behind BAD_POOL_CALL.

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Yes it started when I installed EIS + upgraded to Windows 10 CU. Since then I formatted and reinstalled windows 10 CU and EIS and still I get this BSOD. Those are the two most notable variables, everything else seems to have been working fine for years without such BSOD code.

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Disabling HIPS and then rebooting and see how things go might be a good starting point (setup>computer protection>hips). See if the problem persists if you do that.

 

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Unfortunately both that and disabling SSL filtering will take time to test if BSODs happen.

Another thing is that disabling HIPS brings notifications that protection is not secure enough which is really annoying. People hate to see tray icon showing something is wrong + getting notifications how ~"you should really enable xxx protection because you are not protected enough."

Edited by MarkF
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Yes i can understand that you don't want to see the messages about the protection being off. It's just a temporary thing for testing to see if it helps with the problem you are having.

It just helps when trying to narrow down where the problem is coming from, as there are quite a few things it could be.

I'm more inclined to think its a bad driver somewhere that's causing the issue though. Very like the "irql_not_less_or_equal" BSOD  when a bad driver is installed.

Might be worth checking for updated network adapter drivers and chipset drivers too as these can be problematic. This app is free and it does a good job of fetching and updating drivers. You could try using it and uninstall it after you have done the updates.

hxxp://www.iobit.com/en/driver-booster.php

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Even though it is possible that something else is a matter I'm not inclined to think it's other software than ESET and/or Windows 10 CU because I'm very meticulous about observing what is happening with my computer and the only variables changed since these BSODs started happening were ESET and Win10 CU upgrade. Having in mind I completely formatted disk and reinstalled Win10 CU that narrows down the possibility and likelihood of rogue driver doing it.

Considering examining minidumps, and googling few terms always bring me into connection to ESET in my search I'm very much inclined to think it's connected to ESET.

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I read that you had formatted your drive and had only installed EIS and were then having your problem, and the reason why i suggested that it might be a issue with one of the drivers that windows has installed by default.

" BAD_POOL_CALLER 0x000000c2 kaspersky" , " BAD_POOL_CALLER 0x000000c2 avast" , " BAD_POOL_CALLER 0x000000c2 trend micro" , " BAD_POOL_CALLER 0x000000c2 ESET", " BAD_POOL_CALLER 0x000000c2 malwarebytes" , " BAD_POOL_CALLER 0x000000c2 bitdefender.

All of these and more have matches on google, but you get the idea ......

On the surface it might look like the AV product is the culprit , but its something else that's the root of the trouble all along.

If you believe that it's EIS that is the cause then you would be better off contacting one of the moderators on the site. Marcos is your man :)

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I know what you mean and more conclusive evidence would be uninstalling ESET and monitoring if BSODs happen again.

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I'd suggest configuring Windows to generate complete memory dumps. If you reproduce the crash, compress the memory dump, upload it to a safe location and pm me a download link along with logs in a zip file generated by ESET Log Collector.

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